Cliff Notes™, Cliffs Notes™, Cliffnotes™, Cliffsnotes™ are trademarked properties of the John Wiley Publishing Company. TheBestNotes.com does not provide or claim to provide free Cliff Notes™ or free Sparknotes™. Free Cliffnotes™ and Free Spark Notes™ are trademarked properties of the John Wiley Publishing Company and Barnes & Noble, Inc., respectively. TheBestNotes.com has no relation.

TheBestNotes.com: Free Summary / Study Guide / Book Summaries / Literature Notes / Analysis / Synopsis
 
+Larger Font+
-Smaller Font-





Free Study Guide: Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen - Free BookNotes

Previous Page | Table of Contents | Next Page
Downloadable / Printable Version


PRIDE AND PREJUDICE: FREE ONLINE BOOK NOTES

CHAPTER 31

Summary

Colonel Fitzwilliam is about thirty years old and, though he is not very handsome, his manners make him popular. A week after the arrival of her nephews, Lady Catherine ‘condescends’ to invite Mr. Collins’ guests to a party at Rosings on Sunday evening. Colonel Fitzwilliam is attracted to Elizabeth and converses with her animatedly. The mutually engrossed couple draws the attention of Darcy and Lady Catherine. The latter has no qualms about rudely interrupting their conversation, calling out questions to them. Fitzwilliam asks Elizabeth to play the piano, and she agrees; Lady Catherine, however, rudely continues to talk while Elizabeth is performing. Disgusted by his aunt’s churlish manner, Darcy stands by the piano to pay attention to Elizabeth. During the evening, Elizabeth cannot see any signs of love between Darcy and Miss de Borough.

Notes


Darcy seems a little jealous of the fact that his cousin and Elizabeth are engrossed in conversation. He is also horrified at his aunt’s rude behavior. Lady Catherine continuously interrupts Colonel Fitzwilliam and Elizabeth’s conversation. She insults Elizabeth by suggesting that she should practice the piano more often and by saying she is free to use the servants’ room, where she "will not be in the way". Lady Catherine’s crude behavior embarrasses Darcy, just as Mrs. Bennet’s oafish behavior often embarrasses Elizabeth. Lady Catherine’s loud talking while Elizabeth is playing the piano totally exasperates Darcy. When he stands by the piano in order to hear better, Elizabeth accuses him of trying to unsettle her. In this scene, as in many others, Elizabeth misunderstands Darcy.


CHAPTER 32

Summary

Since the rest of the party has gone out, the next morning Elizabeth sits alone, writing a letter to Jane. Darcy suddenly walks in. Both of them are at loss for words, but Elizabeth finally asks about the abrupt departure of the Bingleys from Netherfield. Darcy does not say much, but he tells her that Bingley may dispose of Netherfield. Their conversation is interrupted by the entry of Charlotte and her sister. After Darcy departs, Charlotte tells Elizabeth of her notion that Darcy is in love with her. Elizabeth laughs at the suggestion. Darcy and Fitzwilliam begin to often come to the parsonage. Although Darcy usually says little, Charlotte notices that he often looks at Elizabeth.

Notes

Darcy’s frequent visits to the parsonage and his awkward reticent manner suggest that he is in love with Elizabeth; Elizabeth, however, is as blind to his affection as she is to his goodness. Even when Charlotte suggests Darcy’s love, Elizabeth only laughs at the notion.

The contrast between Colonel Fitzwilliam and Darcy is further portrayed. Fitzwilliam, with his informed mind, is nothing more than a superior version of Wickham. Ironically, Elizabeth judges him to be a superior person to Darcy.


CHAPTER 33

Summary

Elizabeth, rambling in the park, often meets Darcy unexpectedly. On these occasions, he walks with her and asks odd questions about her likes and dislikes. Once she meets Fitzwilliam while she is strolling, and they speak of Darcy. Fitzwilliam tells her that recently Darcy has saved a friend from an unwise marriage, and he suspects this friend to be Bingley. Elizabeth is pained over hearing the news. She is furious with Darcy for ruining her sister’s life. She later feigns a headache so she will not have to accompany the others to Rosings; angry with Darcy for his interference in Jane’s life, she does not want to see him.

Notes

When she strolls in the park, Elizabeth sometimes encounters Fitzwilliam or Darcy, who walk with her. It is obvious that Fitzwilliam adores Elizabeth; but he cannot contemplate marrying her, for as the younger son, he has neither wealth nor property to offer.

The mystery of Bingley’s abrupt departure from Netherfield is solved. Colonel Fitzwilliam unknowingly tells Elizabeth that Darcy has stopped a friend, probably Bingley, from an unwise marriage. Elizabeth is agitated over the news and hates Darcy as never before for meddling in Jane's life. It is a part of Austen’s dramatic stratagem that Darcy’s proposal should follow immediately after this revelation.


Previous Page | Table of Contents | Next Page
Downloadable / Printable Version


Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen: Free BookNotes Summary


Privacy Policy
All Content Copyright©TheBestNotes. All Rights Reserved.
No further distribution without written consent.
100 Users Online | This page has been viewed 3975 times
This page was last updated on 5/9/2017 8:50:52 AM

Cite this page:

TheBestNotes.com Staff. "TheBestNotes on Pride and Prejudice". TheBestNotes.com. . 09 May 2017
             <>.