Cliff Notes™, Cliffs Notes™, Cliffnotes™, Cliffsnotes™ are trademarked properties of the John Wiley Publishing Company. TheBestNotes.com does not provide or claim to provide free Cliff Notes™ or free Sparknotes™. Free Cliffnotes™ and Free Spark Notes™ are trademarked properties of the John Wiley Publishing Company and Barnes & Noble, Inc., respectively. TheBestNotes.com has no relation.

TheBestNotes.com: Free Summary / Study Guide / Book Summaries / Literature Notes / Analysis / Synopsis
 
+Larger Font+
-Smaller Font-





Free Study Guide for Life of Pi by Yann Martel Book Summary

Previous Page
| Table of Contents | Next Page
Downloadable / Printable Version


CHAPTER SUMMARIES AND NOTES


CHAPTER 30


Summary

The author meets Pi’s wife. He describes her as Canadian, second generation Indian, with typical Indian features. She is a pharmacist. The author has noticed the religious items in Pi’s house all along, but now sees that there is evidence of married life as well. He suspects it might be Pi’s wife that cooks the torturously spicy food. But then, smiling, Pi says that he has made a special chutney for the author, confirming that Pi is the cook.

Notes

Again the author interjects reality to give the reader insight into Pi’s personality and also to solidify his credibility. These author-narrated chapters convey that the conversations with Pi are real events, not just storytelling.



CHAPTER 31


Summary

Pi arranges to meet Mr. Kumar the Sufi at the zoo, but he is afraid he will not recognize him because Mr. Kumar is physically indistinct. He rubs his eyes as an excuse for not seeing Mr. Kumar approach. When he hears Mr. Kumar’s voice he greets the Sufi with the traditional Muslim phrase, “Salaam alaykum.” As they leisurely walk through the zoo, Mr. Kumar marvels at every creature, but especially the zebras. Just then, the other Mr. Kumar approaches. Pi gives pieces of carrot to each Mr. Kumar to feed to the zebras. The three enjoy the experience. Mr. Kumar remarks, “Equus burchelli boehmi.” The other Mr. Kumar remarks, “Allahu akbar.” Pi simply says, “It’s very pretty.”

Notes

Just as Mr. Kumar the biology teacher’s physical geometry corresponds to his scientism, Mr. Kumar the Sufi’s lack of physical distinction matches his spirituality. In the chapter, Pi does not have to distinguish Mr. Kumar from Mr. Kumar because their words and actions differentiate them. The biology teacher feeds the zebra with a sense of the function of the carrot. The Sufi feeds the zebra with a sense of wonder. The biology teacher’s remark is the scientific name of a Grant’s zebra, separating it from other varieties of zebra. The Sufi’s remark means “God is most Great,” including the zebra as part of the magnificence of God’s work. Pi’s comment is one of perfect contentment because he appreciates the perspectives of both Mr. Kumars.

This scene is a concrete illustration of the coexistence of science and religion motif. Each of the Kumars appreciates the perfection of the animals, with science and religion both having a place. While touring the zoo, the Sufi even quotes a passage from the Qur’an that is not about faith, but about knowledge. “In all this there are messages indeed for a people who use their reason.”


Previous Page
| Table of Contents | Next Page
Downloadable / Printable Version

Life of Pi Study Guide Free BookNotes Plot Summary

Privacy Policy
All Content Copyright©TheBestNotes. All Rights Reserved.
No further distribution without written consent.
102 Users Online | This page has been viewed 26266 times
This page was last updated on 5/9/2017 8:50:37 AM

Cite this page:

Cassie, Donna L.. "TheBestNotes on Life of Pi". TheBestNotes.com. . 09 May 2017
             <>.